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MU Home » Academics » School of Arts and Humanities » Department of Philosophy and Religion

Religion Courses

REL 103 INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION (3 s.h.)
Introduction to religion as a human experience. An introduction of the material (e.g. myth, ritual, institutional arrangements, art) and intellectual (conceptions of the sacred, evil, and liberation) elements of religion. Particular attention directed to religion’s cultural manifestations. This course is offered as needed.

REL 104 INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL LITERATURE (3 s.h.)
Selected biblical passages studied as literature with emphasis on the religious and cultural influence of the English Bible. This course is offered every semester.

REL 105 RELIGION IN AN AGE OF SCIENCE: SUPPLEMENTAL SPIRITUAL INFORMATION (3 s.h.)
Examination of science's questions, methods, history, and results in their relationship to and as a supplement to the enduring religious issues. This course is offered every semester.

REL 106 RELIGION AND AMERICAN CULTURE (3 s.h.)
A historical survey from colonial times to the present of the diversity of religious groups in America. The course examines the relationships that develop between particular religious groups and the larger American culture with particular attention given to the emergence of a "common Protestant religious culture" and the challenges to that Protestant culture. This course is offered every spring semester.

REL 107 RELIGION AND FILM (3 s.h.)
An introduction to religion's material and intellectual elements through an examination of film's interpretation of religion and of the human condition as well as film’s tendency to fulfill certain religious functions. This course offered as possible.

REL 150 EASTERN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS (3 s.h.)
This course will survey the major religious traditions of the East, including Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian and Taoist thought. This course is offered every fall semester.

REL 151 WESTERN RELIGIONS: ANGELS, DEMONS, AND JINN (3 s.h.)
This course will introduce students to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will explore themes of monotheism, evil, freedom, and creation while reading the mythology contained in the scriptures of these three traditions. This course is offered every Fall.

REL 201 SURVEY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT (3 s.h.)
Old Testament writings with emphasis on Hebrew history and faith from the perspective of historical and literary criticism. This course is offered every fall semester in odd-numbered years.

REL 202 SURVEY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT (3 s.h.)
New Testament writings with emphasis on the faith of the early Christian community and the cultural milieu (social, political, cultural, and religious) out of which Christianity arose. This course is offered every spring semester.

REL 301 THE OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS (3 s.h.)
The prophetic tradition in Israel and the lives and messages of Israel’s prophets. Prerequisite: REL 201 or permission of the instructor. This course is offered as needed.

REL 302 JESUS AND THE GOSPELS (3 s.h.)
The modern quest for the historical Jesus, a detailed study of the Gospel accounts, and the cultural significance of Jesus. Prerequisite: REL 202 or permission of the instructor. This course is offered in the fall semester in even-numbered years.

REL 322 RELIGIOUS LITERATURE (3 s.h.)
A study of the theological significance of selected religious works, as grouped around particular themes. This course can be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Depending upon topic, may be cross-listed as PHI 322. Examples of possible foci include Spiritual Autobiography, How to See God in Literature, the "Inklings" (the works of Lewis and Tolkien), Roads to God, Creation Narratives, Eastern Religious Myth, and the Philosophy and Theology of Horror. In addition to examining the theology of the selective texts, time will be spent exploring the relationship between theology and literature—that is, why did these authors choose these particular forms to relate their religious convictions and theological insights?

REL 352 RELIGION IN AMERICA (3 s.h.)
Where is "religious truth" found? In the teachings of the church, in the Bible, in the world, in the inspiration of the heart? And is religion primarily about what we think, what we feel, or what we do? This seminar uses selected primary readings from American theologians to discuss competing views of the task of the theologian and of what religion in America should be about. This course is offered in the fall in the even-numbered years.

REL 403 READING THE BIBLE (3 s.h.)
Exploration of diverse reading strategies (historical, literary, ideological criticism, etc.) in different content areas of the Bible (Prophets, Gospels, etc.) Prerequisite: REL 201 or 202 or permission of the instructor. This course is offered in the spring semester in odd-numbered years. Can be repeated for credit.

REL 404 MYTH AND CULTURE (3 s.h.)
An examination of myth and culture through a reading of scholarly literature and myth. Cross listed as ENG 404. Creditable to one program only: English or Religion. This course is offered in the spring semester in even-numbered years.

REL 405 EARLY AND MEDIEVAL CHRISTIAN HISTORY AND THOUGHT (3 s.h.)
The development of Christianity from Pentecost to the eve of the Reformation with particular attention to doctrinal debates and significant thinkers/writings. This course is offered in the fall semester in odd-numbered years.

REL 406 REFORMATION AND MODERN CHRISTIAN HISTORY AND THOUGHT (3 s.h.)
The development of Christianity from the Reformation to the present with particular attention to significant thinkers/writings and to the crisis sparked by modernity. This course is offered in the spring semester in even-numbered years.

REL 485 SEMINAR IN RELIGION (1-3 s.h.)
Significant works, problems, and thinkers in the field of religion. Topics vary. Can be repeated for credit. Cross listed with PHI 485 when the topic is applicable. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course is offered as needed.

REL 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN RELIGION (TBA)
An opportunity for a well-qualified, upper-division student to engage in special research in his/her major. Requires approval by the faculty advisor, the supervising professor, the department chair, and the school dean before approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Credit to be determined.

 

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