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MU Home » Academicss » School of Public Affairs » Department of Justice Studies, Forensic Science & Cyber Crime

Courses

JUS 220 APPLIED STATISTICS (3 s.h.)
Descriptive and inferential statistics, the logic of probability and hypothesis testing with emphasis on applications in social science research. Statistics covered include measures of central tendency, variability, association and tests of significance. Prerequisite: MAT 105.

JUS 241 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 s.h.)
A study of the American criminal justice system to include the history, philosophy, responsibilities, and functions of the police, courts, and corrections components. Emphasis is placed on role expectations and
interrelationships of the various components and the need to promote professionalism through education, training, and ethical standards. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and SOC 151 or permission of instructor. This
course is offered every fall and spring semester.

JUS 242 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE (3 s.h.)
This course provides a broad overview of the application of scientific principles to the judicial process. Special attention is focused on the disciplines of criminalistics, forensic medicine, and forensic anthropology. Emphasis centers on the physical and biological aspects of physical evidence that lend themselves to the identification and comparison process and on the analytical scientific capabilities available to the criminal justice professional. This course is offered every semester, as well as evenings and on-line as needed.

JUS 243 INTRODUCTION TO CYBER CRIME (3 s.h.)
This course introduces and explains the various types of offenses that qualify as cyber crime activity. Emphasis is placed on identifying cyber crime activity and the response to these problems from both the private and public domains. This class is offered fall and spring.

JUS 250 COMPUTER CRIME INVESTIGATION (3 s.h.)
This course introduces the fundamental principles of computer crime investigation processes. Topics include crime scene/incident processing, information gathering techniques, data retrieval, collection and preservation of evidence, preparation of reports and court presentations.

JUS 251 NETWORKING CONCEPTS (3 s.h.)
This course introduces students to the networking field. Topics include network terminology and protocols, local-area networks, wide-area networks, OSI model, cabling, router programming, Ethernet, IP addressing, and network standards.

JUS 260 INTRODUCTION TO CLANDESTINE LABS (3 s.h.)
This course offers an introduction to, and examination of illegal drug production laboratories. Clandestine drug operations generate a wide variety of law enforcement, social, societal, socioeconomic, and
environmental problems. This course is designed to examine these problems. The course is comprised of three modules: Module 1 covers law enforcement issues; Module 2 covers societal issues; and Module 3
covers environmental and economic issues. Cross-listed as ENM 260 and SWK 260. Offered every spring semester.

JUS 309 CRIMINOLOGY (3 s.h.)
The nature and types of delinquent and criminal behavior; the nature of the criminal and the crime; social, cultural, and psychological factors involved in illegal behavior; control and prevention; police, courts, probation, and correctional institutions. This course is offered every fall and spring semester. Cross listed as SOC 309.

JUS 310 LAW AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM (3 s.h.)
From lynchings to landmark decisions, this course examines the traditions and historical development of the law in America, emphasizing the judicial process. Topics include the types and sources of law, the structure and functions of the state and federal court systems, civil and criminal law procedure, and judicial governance with special attention placed on the U.S. Supreme Court. This course is offered every spring semester. Cross listed as LAW 310 and PSC 310.

JUS 311 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3 s.h.)
The nature and causes of juvenile delinquency, including individual, community, and labeling theories with attention to such social responses as prevention programs, juvenile courts, probation, correctional
institutions, and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: SOC 309 or permission of instructor. This course is offered as needed. Cross listed as SOC 311.

JUS 320 THE CORRECTIONAL PROCESS (3 s.h.)
A study of the post-conviction corrections process of the criminal justice system with a focus on the evolution of philosophies, programs, strategies, and policies. Emphasis will be placed on the current crisis
in American corrections. This course is offered every fall semester.

JUS 321 ALTERNATIVES TO INCARCERATION (3 s.h.)
A study of the philosophy, theory, organization, and effectiveness of probation, parole, and communitybased correction programs. Emphasis is placed on analyzing and evaluating the deinstitutionalization movement, community-based treatment centers, community service agencies, work release programs, and current trends in community corrections. Prerequisite: JUS 320 or permission of instructor. This course is offered as needed.

JUS 330 POLICE IN AN URBAN SOCIETY (3 s.h.)
A study of the historic and current mission of the police in an urban society. Problems associated with law enforcement are evaluated from the perspective of the sociology of the urban subcommunities. Emphasis is
placed on the police as an element within the criminal justice system and on innovative policing strategies. This course is offered every spring semester.

JUS 332 RESEARCH METHODS (3 s.h.)
The course explores the scientific method, research design, single systems design and program evaluation, data-gathering techniques, and data analysis. The student will develop and conduct an original research
project. Prerequisites: Statistics. This course is offered every fall semester. Cross listed as SOC 332 and SWK332.

JUS 340 NETWORK VULNERABILITIES (3 s.h.)
This course introduces students to penetration testing, network vulnerabilities, and hacking. Topics include an overview of traditional network security, system hardening, and known weaknesses. Prerequisites: JUS 241, JUS 243, JUS 250, JUS 251

JUS 350 CYBER CRIME ETHICS AND LAW (3 s.h.)
This course covers the applicable technological laws dealing with the regulation of cyber security and criminal activity, as well as the ethical considerations and accepted standard practices applicable to technological investigations and computer privacy issues relative to the cyber crime investigator. Topics include an examination of state, federal and international laws regarding cyber crime with an emphasis on both general and North Carolina statutes, illegal and unethical investigative activities, end-justifying-the-means issues, and privacy issues of massive personal database information gathered by governmental sources. Prerequisites: JUS 241 and JUS 243.

JUS 360 BASIC DATA RECOVERY (3 s.h.)
This course introduces the unique skills and methodologies necessary to assist in the investigation and prosecution of cyber crimes. Topics include hardware and software issues, recovering erased files, overcoming encryption, advanced imaging, transient data, Internet issues and testimony considerations. Prerequisites: JUS 241, 243, 250, and 251.

JUS 370 SECURITY CONCEPTS (3 s.h.)
This course introduces the concepts and issues related to securing information systems and the development of policies to implement information security controls. Topics include the historical view of networking and security, security issues, trends, security resources, and the role of policy, people, and processes in information security. Prerequisites: JUS 241, 243, 250, and 251.

JUS 382 WOMEN AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3 s.h.)
This course provides students with a survey of the variety of ways in which females come into contact with the criminal justice system, looking at women as victims, as offenders, as prisoners, and as professionals
working in the criminal justice system. Historically, the study of criminal justice has focused on male offending and deviant behavior. This course will examine the distribution of crimes affecting women, how female offenders differ from male offenders, survey the historical development of theories that explain or have not explained female offenders, and how the criminal justice system deals with female offenders. The focus throughout this course will be on special issues and special problems associated with adult and juvenile females and the criminal justice system and how these contrast with the experiences of males in the criminal justice system. Students should note this is a writing intensive class. Prerequisites: JUS 241, SOC 151, JUS 309, SOC 309 or permission of the instructor. This course is offered every fall semester odd years.

JUS 389 CRIMINAL EVIDENCE AND PROCEDURE (3 s.h.)
A study of criminal law and various theories of criminal evidence available to prosecutors. Emphasis is placed on legal principles governing forensic analysis and the handling of evidence during a criminal investigation. Prerequisites: JUS/PSC/LAW 310 or permission of instructor. This course is offered every spring semester.

JUS 390 VICTIMOLOGY (3 s.h.)
The course will examine the multifaceted problems of criminal victimization. Special emphasis will be placed on definitions of victimization, characteristics of victims, treatment of victims in the criminal justice
system, and efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of victimization. The role of victimology in the conduct of criminal investigations will be reviewed. Prerequisites: JUS 309 or permission of the instructor. This course is offered every spring semester.

JUS 396 CRIMINAL PROFILING (3 s.h.)
The course introduces the student to a general overview of the various typologies and classification models by which offenders are profiled. Past and present profiling models are reviewed with an emphasis on the emerging scientific field of investigative psychology. Various examples of crime scenes will be studied for the purpose of understanding how investigators utilize information and evidence obtained from the crimescenes to create a profile of the offender. Prerequisites: JUS 309 or permission of instructor. This course is offered every fall semester in the classroom , as well as evenings and on-line as needed.

JUS 397 CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3 s.h.)
A course designed for specialized forensic training for students interested in the forensic science concentration and justice studies major. The student will conduct hands-on training in a laboratory setting with state-of-the-art alternate light sources, imaging devices, fingerprint developing techniques, and other forensic science devices and instruments. The student will be provided an overview of impression evidence, evidence collection, and crime scene processing. An off-campus trip to the State Bureau of Investigation Laboratory will be planned during the semester. This course will be offered every spring semester and summer as needed.

JUS 401 THE INVESTIGATIVE PROCESS (3 s.h.)
A study of the criminal investigative process to include the application of criminalistics, forensic medicine, and the behavioral sciences to the successful solution of criminal cases. Emphasis is placed on the
application of the scientific method to the investigative process. Prerequisite: JUS 241 or permission of instructor. This course is offered every semester and summer on-line as needed.

JUS 404 POLICE AND THE CONSTITUTION (3 s.h.)
A study of the laws of arrest, search and seizure, and confessions; legal aspects of entrapment; legal constraints of deadly force; and other legal issues affecting police. Emphasis is placed on the case studyapproach and analytical reasoning. Prerequisite: JUS 241 or permission of instructor. This course is offered in the fall semester of odd years.

JUS 410 MEDICOLEGAL INVESTIGATION OF DEATH (3 s.h.)
A study of the legal and forensic concepts and procedures for the medico-legal investigation of death due to natural, accidental, suicidal or criminal reasons. Special emphasis will be placed on use of anatomy and
medical terminology, death investigation techniques, and various causes of death. Prerequisites: JUS 401 or permission of instructor. This course is offered in the spring semester and every summer online.

JUS 415 FORENSIC FIREARMS IDENTIFICATION (3 s.h.)
A specialized forensic science course designed for students interested in a forensic science concentration and justice studies major. This course is designed to provide the student an overview of how firearms and ammunition differ by design, manufacturer, load, and caliber, and how the design impacts lethality, wound pattern, and deposition of forensic evidence. Students will be exposed to real firearms of different calibers and will be allowed to attend a firearms range with an emphasis on studying different effects of different caliber weapons. This course will be offered every fall semester, as well as summer as needed.

JUS 420 ETHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 s.h.)
A study of the basic concepts, arguments, and methods of ethics as they apply to those who work in the field of criminal justice. Students will be introduced to the classic theories of normative ethics. Emphasis is placed on the case study approach and ethical decision-making. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course is offered every fall semester. Cross listed as PHI 420.

JUS 425-435 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 s.h.)
Courses will be offered, as needed, in areas of special interest such as forensic science, crime prevention, criminal justice administration, organized crime, judicial process, private security, and criminal justice
planning. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

JUS 450 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 s.h.)
Senior level course focusing on a critical evaluation of policies and programs in the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of a senior research paper with visual presentation. Prerequisites: JUS 241, JUS/SOC 309, (SOC 220, MAT 220, or PSY 250), SOC 282, and JUS/SOC 332 or permission of the department chair. This course is offered every fall and spring semester.

JUS 455 TERRORISM AND THE HOMELAND SECURITY RESPONSE (3 s.h.)
A study of the terrorist threat in America and the creation of the Office of Homeland Security to address that threat. Emphasis will be placed on examining the attack on September 11, 2001 and the government's
response via creation of the Office of Homeland Security. The nature of the terrorist threat, organization of the Office of Homeland Security, risk assessment models, and special programs and legislation created to
address the terrorist threat will be discussed. This course is offered every spring semester.

JUS 470 INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 s.h.)
Experiential learning in an approved criminal justice agency for supervised practical experience through a ten-week placement at a criminal justice agency. The student is assigned duties and responsibilities approved by the faculty member and on-site supervisor. Minimum requirement of 120 hours in the field agency and participation in a weekly seminar. Supervision and evaluation is conducted by the faculty member and the on-site professional. Written reports and evaluations are required at the completion of the internship. Students must apply for the internship during early-registration prior to taking the course. Prerequisites: senior standing, permission of department chair, and a cumulative GPA of 2.3 or higher. This course is offered every fall , spring semester, and summer semester.

JUS 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (TBA)
An opportunity for a well-qualified, upper-division student to engage in special research in his/her major. Requires approval by the faculty advisor, the supervising professor, the department chair, and the school dean before approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Credit to be determined.

 

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